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Some people may be surprised to learn that an individual does not always need to be a citizen of the United States to qualify for government benefits such as Social Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Medicare.  Provided the individual receives or qualifies to receive SSI or SSDI benefits, and the person otherwise qualifies for Medicare, a non-US citizen (non-citizen) typically qualifies for Medicare Part A without having to pay a premium.  They would still need to pay a premium for Medicare Part B.  Before addressing how a non-citizen may become eligible to receive Social Security benefits and therefore, be one step closer to qualifying for Medicare, we will first look at the distinctions between SSI and SSDI and how US citizens become eligible for either.

SSDI and SSI Requirements for U.S. Citizens

For U.S. citizens to qualify for SSDI, they must be under 65, have earned enough work credits1 by working and paying Social Security (FICA) taxes, and have a qualifying disability sufficient to meet the definition designated by the Social Security Administration (SSA).  A majority of those who apply for SSDI do not get accepted on the first try. Many injured individuals have found value in retaining attorneys to help with the application (and the commonly required appeals) process.

A major distinction between SSDI and SSI is that SSI does not require any work history or the need for the individual to be disabled, even though disability is one of the ways a person may qualify for SSI.  For example, those that are disabled but haven’t accumulated enough work credits to be eligible for SSDI, may qualify for SSI.  Furthermore, U.S. citizens who are 65 or older, or who are blind or are disabled, and have limited income and limited resources, and are not confined to an institution, are generally eligible for SSI.  Another important distinction between SSDI and SSI is that once a person receives SSDI benefits for two years2 , the SSDI recipient will be eligible for Medicare benefits.

Requirements for Non-U.S. Citizens

If a person is a non-citizen and meets the following requirements, they may be eligible for Social Security benefits:

  • Non-citizens who are legal permanent residents
  • Active members or veterans of the U.S. military
  • Foreign workers who have paid FICA taxes for the required time period3
  • Other non-citizens who are not permanent residents but who can prove that they are here legally (i.e., refugees, those under political asylum, temporary visitors with non-immigrant visas, abuse victims, etc.)

There are many exceptions and rules regarding non-citizens’ status and SSI and SSDI eligibility.  Additionally, non-citizens that are allowed to work in the US but not required to pay FICA taxes (and don’t), are not eligible for SSDI.

Aside from standard SSDI eligibility requirements that everyone must meet*, there are two additional requirements that non-citizens must meet in order to qualify for SSDI:

    1. If an individual was assigned a Social Security number on or after January 2, 2004, the individual’s number must have been assigned based on their authorization to work in the U.S. or they must have B-1, D-1, or D-2 worker status.
    2. Before receiving disability benefits, the individual must show proof that they are in the U.S. legally.

 

Non-Citizens Returning to their Countries

Once an individual receives either type of Social Security benefits as a non-citizen, if, when and how these benefits will be distributed depends on the country that they are citizens of and how much time they may spend in that country, whether that country is on a restricted list, and whether that country has a bilateral Social Security agreement with the U.S.  Some countries that the SSA is restricted from sending Social Security payments to, such as those listed below, are disqualified from accepting Social Security payments.

    • Azerbaijan
    • Belarus
    • Cuba
    • Kazakhstan
    • Kyrgyzstan
    • Moldova
    • North Korea
    • Tajikstan
    • Turkmenistan
    • Ukraine
    • Uzbekistan
    • Vietnam

 

Ineligible Countries

Legal residents from Cuba, North Korea, and Vietnam may not receive disability benefits, even if they meet the other necessary requirements.

If a citizen of one of the above-listed countries, other than from Cuba, North Korea or Vietnam, goes back to their home country after working and living in the U.S. and otherwise qualifies for a form of Social Security Benefits, the SSA will not send the individual payments and cannot send the payments to someone else on their behalf (unless an exception is granted).  The SSA will withhold these payments and will only send them to the individual once they are in a country to which the U.S. may send those payments.  Generally, if the SSA is not restricted from sending payments to a particular country, but the country also does not have a bilateral Social Security agreement in place with the U.S., the SSA can send payments to the individual, but will stop the individual’s payments after the person has been outside of the U.S. for six months.  If the individual returns to the U.S. and stays for at least a month, they are usually eligible to begin receiving benefits again. The SSA’s website provides information and exceptions concerning these matters including the difference between a person receiving benefits based on their own earnings or residency in the U.S. versus receiving benefits based on the earnings or residency in the U.S. of a dependent or survivor.  A pamphlet that provides additional information is available on SSA’s website.

The Medicare Secondary Payer Act (MSP), 42 U.S.C. §1395y(b)(2), enacted in 1980 and aimed at preserving Medicare Trust Funds and reigning in Medicare costs that had up to that point been much larger than projected4 , is focused on both the timing of payments and the recovery of Medicare’s conditional payments5 for medical expenses6 of injured Medicare beneficiaries or injured people who have a reasonable expectation of becoming Medicare beneficiaries within 30 months from settlement, when another (primary) payer is responsible for payment or prompt reimbursement of the injured individual’s injury related Medicare covered medical expenses.7 There are several ways people fall into the reasonable expectation of becoming a Medicare beneficiary within 30-month time frame, including reaching 62.5 years of age, applying for SSDI, being denied but considering appeal of SSDI denial, being in the process of appealing the denial, or being diagnosed with end-stage renal disease or ALS, a/k/a Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Contact Us

If you have additional questions regarding government benefits for your clients, please reach out to us here. Additionally, if you are involved in a settlement with a client whose government benefits may be at risk, Medivest would like to provide you with the following data chart. It summarizes a variety of public benefit programs and the best course of action you can take to ensure your clients’ benefits are protected. Click here to download.

 

  1. The number of work credits needed varies based on the age of the individual at the time they become disabled.  Required credits start at 6 credits or 1.5 years of work during the three-year period before the disability started for people disabled in or before the quarter they turn 24 years of age and move up to a requirement for 40 qualifying quarters at or after they turn 62 years of age, with varying requirements in between. []
  2. The two-year requirement does not include the approximate six-month wait time between the date disability is approved and benefits begin. Eligibility begins 30 days after the established onset date (EOD) so along with a mandatory five-month waiting period, it is essentially six months before payments start or 30 months from EOD to Medicare eligibility. []
  3. *According to the SSA website, the required work requirements for non-citizens seem to be different from those of US citizens as well. The requirement for non-citizens does not appear to have a sliding scale for work credits that US citizens are required to have.  Here is an example of some non-citizen requirements for SSDI eligibility from SSA’s website: “[t]hey are a Lawfully Admitted for Permanent Residence (LAPR) with 40 qualifying quarters of earnings.  Work done in the US by a person’s spouse or parent may also count toward the 40 qualifying quarters of earnings, but only for getting SSI. Quarters of earnings earned after December 31, 1996 are not counted if the individual, spouse, or parent worked or received certain benefits from the U.S. government based on limited income and resources during that period. If a person entered the U.S. for the first time on or after August 22, 1996 they may not be eligible for SSI for the first five years as a LAPR, even if they have 40 qualifying quarters of earnings.” More information regarding this topic is available here.  Sometimes depending on the country of citizenship, there may also be other ways for a non-citizen to qualify for SSI including living in the US for required periods of time or having a spouse or parent who has lived long enough in the U.S. (See https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10137.pdf).  You are encouraged to consult with an attorney practicing in the SSI and SSDI benefits field to help determine whether any particular person may qualify for Social Security benefits. []
  4. Humana Med. Plan, Inc. v. Western Heritage Ins. Co., 2018 WL 549834 (11th Cir. Jan. 25, 2018) declining to rehear 2016 11th Cir. case en banc and citing 5 James B. Wadley, West’s Federal Administrative Practice §6305 2017. []
  5. Or conditional payments by Medicare Advantage Plans that a primary payer should have paid. []
  6. Medical items, services, and expenses, including prescription drug expenses. []
  7. 42 U.S.C. § 1395y(b)(2)(A)(ii) prohibits Medicare from making payment to the extent that “payment has been made or can reasonably be expected to be made under a workmen’s compensation law or plan of the United States or a State or under an automobile or liability insurance policy or plan (including a self-insured plan) or under no-fault insurance.” Furthermore, under the Code of Federal Regulations, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has rights to recover any conditional payments Medicare made that a primary payer should have made or reimbursed, specifically, “CMS may initiate recovery as soon as it learns that payment has been made or could be made under workers’ compensation, any liability or no-fault insurance, or an employer group health plan.” 42 C.F.R. § 411.24(b). []

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22/May/2023

On Tuesday, June 6th, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will be hosting a webinar regarding the upcoming implementation of the Section 111 NGHP Unsolicited Response File option. The full notice can be read below:

 


 

Section 111 Non-Group Health Plan (NGHP) Unsolicited Response File Webinar Tuesday June 6, 2023

Mandatory Reporting for Liability Insurance (including Self-Insurance), No-Fault Insurance and Workers’ Compensation

CMS will be hosting a webinar regarding the upcoming implementation of the Section 111 NGHP Unsolicited Response File option. The format will be opening remarks by CMS, a presentation that will include background as well as how to opt in and what to expect, followed by a question and answer session. For questions regarding this topic, prior to the webinar, please utilize the Section 111 Resource Mailbox PL110- 173SEC111-comments@cms.hhs.gov.

Date:                                 June 6, 2023
Time:                                 1:00 PM ET

Webinar Link: https://cms.zoomgov.com/j/1601170809?pwd=YU1YN3BGYjhKWTNBR3AyT3o4emFWQT09

Passcode:                          558113

Or to connect via phone

Conference Dial In:           1-833-568-8864
Conference Passcode:     160 117 0809

Due to the number of expected participants please log in at least 10 minutes prior to the start of the presentation.


 

Additional information about recent updates from CMS can be found here. If you have questions on how topics discussed in this webinar may affect your clients, please contact Medivest here or call us at 877.725.2467.

 


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17/Nov/2022

On Tuesday, December 6, 2022, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will be hosting a webinar entitled, “Mandatory Reporting for Liability Insurance (including Self-Insurance), No-Fault Insurance and Workers’ Compensation”. The full notice can be read below:

 


 

CMS will be hosting a Section 111 NGHP webinar. The format will be opening remarks by CMS, a presentation that will include NGHP reporting best practices and reminders followed by a question and answer session. For questions regarding Section 111 reporting, prior to the webinar, please utilize the Section 111 Resource Mailbox PL110- 173SEC111-comments@cms.hhs.gov.

Date:          December 6, 2022
Time:          2:00 PM ET

Webinar Link:  https://cms.zoomgov.com/j/1604816351?pwd=QmlUVUl1MkU4Y3htY1J0M0tUN3hoUT09

Passcode:  001534

Or to connect via phone:

Conference Dial In:          1-833-568-8864
Conference Passcode:    160 481 6351

Due to the number of expected participants please log in at least 10 minutes prior to the start of the presentation.


 

Additional information about recent updates from CMS can be found here. If you have questions on how topics discussed in this webinar may affect your clients, please contact Medivest here or call us at 877.725.2467.

 


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15/Nov/2022

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a revised Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set-Aside Arrangement (WCMSAReference Guide (“Reference Guide”) Version 3.8 on November 14, 2022. This Reference Guide replaces Version 3.7 which was released on June 6, 2022. There are a few notable changes when comparing the two Reference Guides.
 

CMS’s Version 3.8 Reference Guide, Section 1.1 includes the following changes:

Changes in This Version of the Guide Version 3.8 of this guide includes the following changes: Clarification has been provided regarding re-review requests when errors exist in the submission documentation, as well as re-review limitations (Sections 16.1 and 16.2). Note: These re-review changes are only available for approvals from September 1, 2022 forward.

To download the new WCMSA Reference Guide v3.8 Click Here.

For your convenience, we have included the entirety of Section 16.1 and 16.2, so you will have the most up to date information regarding the process of re-review:

16.1 Re-Review

When CMS does not believe that a proposed set-aside adequately protects Medicare’s interests, and thus makes a determination of a different amount than originally proposed, there is no formal appeals process. However, there are several other options available. First, the claimant may provide the WCRC with additional documentation in order to justify the original proposal amount. If the additional information does not convince the WCRC to change the originally submitted WCMSA amount and the parties proceed to settle the case despite the lack of change, then Medicare will not recognize the settlement. Medicare will exclude its payments for the medical expenses related to the injury or illness until WC settlement funds expended for services otherwise reimbursable by Medicare use up the entire settlement. Thereafter, when Medicare denies a particular beneficiary’s claim, the beneficiary may appeal that particular claim denial through Medicare’s regular administrative appeals process. Information on applicable appeal rights is provided at the time of each claim denial as part of the explanation of benefits.

 

A request for re-review may be submitted based one of the following:
  1. Mathematical Error: Where the appropriately authorized submitter or claimant disagrees with CMS’ decision because CMS’ determination contains obvious mistakes (e.g., a mathematical error or failure to recognize medical records already submitted showing a surgery, priced by CMS, that has already occurred), or
  1. Missing Documentation: Where the submitter or claimant disagrees with CMS’ decision because the submitter has additional evidence, not previously considered by CMS, which was dated prior to the submission date of the original proposal and which warrants a change in CMS’ determination.
    • Disagreement surrounding the inclusion or exclusion of specific treatments or medications does not meet the definition of a mathematical error.
    • Re-Review requests based upon failure to properly review already submitted records must include only the specific documentation referenced as a basis for the request.
    • Should no change be made upon response to a re-review request (i.e., no error was identified), additional requests to re-review the same error will not be entertained.
  1. Submission Error: Where an error exists in the documentation provided for a submission that leads to a change in pricing of no less than $2500.00, a re-review request may be made by submitting updated documents free of errors that caused the original review outcome. Amended documents must come from the originators with appropriate notation to identify that the error was corrected, along with the date of correction and no less than hand-written “wet” signature of the correcting individual. Note: This submission option is only available for approvals from September 1, 2022 forward.
    • Examples include, but may not be limited to; medical records with incorrect patient identifying information or rated ages where the rated-age assessor provided incorrect information in the rated-age document.

 

16.2 Re-Review Limitations

Note: The following re-review limitations are only available for approvals from September 1, 2022 forward.
Re-review shall be limited to no more than one request by type.
Disagreement surrounding the inclusion or exclusion of specific treatments or medications does not meet the definition of a mathematical error.
Re-Review requests based upon failure to properly review already submitted records must include only the specific documentation referenced as a basis for the request.

 

Medivest will continue to monitor changes occurring at CMS and will keep its readers up to date when such changes are announced. For questions, feel free to reach out to the Medivest representative in your area by clicking here or call us direct at 877.725.2467.

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19/Oct/2022

During the settlement process, a personal injury attorney needs to consider what government/public benefits their client is enrolled in and what they may be eligible for in the future. Several questions need to be asked. Have you considered Medicare’s interest in the settlement?  How will the settlement proceeds be handled?  Will a lump sum payment disqualify them from their government benefits? These questions need to be addressed because a client’s settlement could have long-lasting financial implications.
When it comes to settling a case with public benefits there are many nuances to consider. Hiring a team of experts such as an Elder and Special Needs Law Attorney, a Structure Settlement Broker, a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) Allocator, and/or a Trust Advisor can assist you in protecting your client’s benefits and preserving the settlement proceeds.

 

Getting Familiar With Public Benefits

Public benefits can either be federal or state-run programs.  If the benefits program is run by the state, each state has its own set of criteria for eligibility.  Needs-based public benefits are also known as asset means-tested public benefits.  Asset means-tested means that eligibility is based on an individual’s income level and assets.  To learn more about all the different types of government benefits Gov/Benefits.
Government benefits are categorized into two types which are Needs-Based Benefits and Entitlement Benefits.
  1. Needs-Based Benefits – Also referred to as “means-tests,” these are based on an individual’s income and/or assets
  2. Non-Needs Based Benefits Aka Entitlements Based – These are determined by what an individual has contributed or paid into a given benefits system
 

Common Government Benefits

Below is a list and summary of the most frequently used government benefit programs. However, this is not a complete list, and a full investigation of a client’s use of government benefits should be conducted before the settlement process begins.

Medicare

Government national health insurance program in the United States, begun in 1965 under the Social Security Administration and now administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. It is intended for people who are 65 or older,  certain younger people with disabilities, and people with end-stage renal disease.

Social Security Disability (SSDI)

Payroll tax-funded federal insurance program of the United States government. It is managed by the Social Security Administration and designed to provide monthly benefits to people who have a medically determinable disability that restricts their ability to be employed.

Social Security Income (SSI)

Means-tested program that provide cash payments to disabled children, disabled adults, and individuals aged 65 or older who are citizens or nationals of the United States.

Medicaid

Health coverage programs operated by states, within broad federal guidelines. Although the federal government pays a portion of the costs, Medicaid is administered and operated by states, and each state’s program is different and based on the needs and goals of the individual state.

Medicaid Adult / Disability-Based

  • Permanently disabled & unable to work
  • Only Income Test applies in California
  • Income & Asset Test applies
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients
  • In-Home Support Services (IHSS) recipients
  • Home & community-based waivers participants
  • Long-Term Care Facility residents

Medicaid Adult / Non-Disability Based

  • Able to work & income is below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)
  • MAGI Medicaid on household income
  • Assets are not counted toward
  • Pregnant women

Medicaid – Children Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

This program is administered by the United States Department of health and Human Services that provides matching funds to states for health insurance to families with children.

Section 8 – Housing Assistance

The housing choice voucher program aids very low-income families to afford decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Housing can include single-family homes, townhouses and apartments and is not limited to units located in subsidized housing projects. Housing choice vouchers are administered locally by Public Housing Agencies (PHAs).

Veterans Administration (VA)

The United States Department of Veterans Affairs of the federal government providing life-long healthcare services to eligible military veterans at VA medical centers and outpatient clinics.

Our Complimentary Reference Guide for Government Benefit Protection

For further information on how to protect your clients’ government benefits after a settlement, Medivest would like to provide the following data chart. It summarizes a variety of public benefit programs and the best course of action you can take to ensure their benefits are protected.  Click here to download.

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15/Aug/2022

Consider this scenario: you are a personal injury attorney, and you get a call from a new client who is 63 years old and is interested in settling her automobile accident case.  Per the Medicare Secondary Payer statute and as part of the case workup, you need to make sure you are not shifting the burden to Medicare.

What is the Medicare Secondary Payer Statute?

The MSP statute was passed by Congress in 1980 in order to protect the financial integrity of the Medicare Trust Fund. Per this statute/law, Medicare is a secondary payer for workers’ compensation, no-fault insurance, liability insurance, self-insured plans, and employer group health plan insurance. According to the MSP regulations, these other sources of health care coverage are to be the primary payer, with Medicare being the secondary form of payment.

What is a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) Proposal?

A MSA proposal is a detailed report indicating the anticipated Medicare allowable, Injury-related expenses for the remainder of the injured individual’s life expectancy.  It is a calculation that determines a dollar amount that should be “set aside”  as part of the settlement process to satisfy the Medicare Secondary Payer Statute (MSP) and to avoid shifting the burden to Medicare.

Guidance from Medicare for Liability Cases

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published the WCMSA Reference Guide to help attorneys understand the process CMS uses for approving proposed Workers’ Compensation MSA (WCMSA) arrangements. The purpose of the WCMSA Reference Guide was to consolidate and supplant all the historical CMS memos into a single point of reference.
However, Workers’ Compensation and Liability settlements have several different nuances.  CMS has yet to release the long-awaited LMSA Reference Guide for liability settlements, despite announcing its intention to do so in 2018. Given the current lack of guidance concerning Liability MSAs from CMS, attorneys should look to the WCMSA Reference Guide for guidance when settling their liability cases.

Litmus Test –  Is a MSA Proposal Recommended?

In order to determine if a MSA allocation is recommended to cover Medicare’s interest in your settlement, there are several key items to review. Attorneys can do a quick MSA litmus test to determine whether or not a MSA is recommended.
  • Your client is currently Medicare-eligible
  • Your client is 62.5 years old and within 30 months of becoming eligible for Medicare benefits
  • Your client has either applied for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or has an open or pending application Will there be any money after medical liens have been resolved to fund a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) account?

Medicare Eligibility

What is Medicare’s criteria for an individual to become Medicare eligible? Medicare is available for people aged 65 or older, younger people with disabilities, and people with End Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplant).

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)

An individual who has either applied or has reapplied for Social Security Disability Insurance can become Medicare eligible. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is a federal program that helps those who have become disabled from work.  An individual can apply for SSDI when:
  • A person is unable to engage in any “substantial gainful activity” due to an illness or disability and;
  • When a person is not able to return to work for 12 months or more and;
  • When a person has accumulated enough work credits in the last 10 years to qualify.

30 Months to Become Medicare Eligible

The reason why it takes 30 months to become Medicare eligible after the individual has either applied or reapplied for SSDI is that:
  • The individual needs to wait one month after the date of injury to apply for SSDI.
  • After the SSDI applicate date, there is a waiting period of 5 months to receive SSDI entitlement.
  • From the date of SSDI entitlement, Medicare has 24 months waiting period to become Medicare eligible.

Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) – Not Required by Law

Did you know that a Medicare Set-Aside is not required by law? You should know the risks if you choose not to have a MSA prepared, by understanding CMS’ interpretation regarding MSP compliance. In the event there was a failure to address Medicare’s interest in the settlement, Medicare may refuse to pay future medical expenses that are injury-related until the entire settlement is exhausted.

Best Practices

Our highly trained Medicare Expert Case Advisors can help you figure out if Medicare may have an interest in your settlement. We assist all settling parties to navigate the MSP complexities and provide you with cost-saving strategies for your settlement.
To receive our complimentary MSA Decision Tree, “When Is a MSA Allocation Recommended?”  click here.

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Over the past 17 years of working in the MSP compliance industry, I have noticed that few things can cause as much confusion when it comes to Medicare eligibility for children/kids. This blog is intended to clear up some of the confusion surrounding Medicare benefits for children to assist with settlement planning.
Medicare defines children/kids as anyone who is under the age of 22 and unmarried. Once a child/kid qualifies for Medicare benefits, they can keep Medicare coverage until the age of 26, as long as they are unmarried and continue to meet the qualifications.
Medicare coverage for kids is available but only in limited circumstances. For a child to be eligible for Medicare benefits, the following criteria must be met:
  1. The child must have End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and need regular dialysis treatments or have recently had a kidney transplant
  2. The child must have a parent or legal guardian who has earned at least six Social Security (SS) work credits in the last 3 years or is currently receiving Social Security Retirement benefits
Medicare defines a parent or legal guardian as either biological, adoptive, or stepparent. If the child is in the care of stepparents, the stepparents need to have been the child’s stepparents for at least one year for the child to be eligible for Medicare benefits if the other criteria have been met.
If the criteria have been met, the child will continue to receive Medicare benefits until 12 months after the last dialysis treatment or 3 years after a kidney transplant. Medicare coverage can restart if additional treatment is needed for ESRD.
If a child is between the ages of 20 and 22 and meets a few additional requirements, they may be eligible for Medicare benefits. Those additional requirements are:
  1. The individual has been receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for at least 24 months
  2. The disability began before the age of 18
  3. The disability prevents the individual from working and is expected to last longer than one year
It is uncommon for a child to be eligible for Medicare benefits, but it is possible. Suppose you are settling a case for a minor who currently has ESRD or is between the ages of 20 and 22 and has a qualifying disability that started prior to age 18. In that case, there is a possibility that they may currently be receiving Medicare benefits.
If you are settling a case for a child who currently receives Medicare benefits, it is important to properly address Medicare as part of the settlement. Considering Medicare’s interests in settlements is how an injured party does their part in complying with the Medicare Secondary Payer Statute (MSP). This includes addressing past medical/conditional payments (Medicare liens) as well as Future Medical/conditional payments because the MSP does not distinguish between pre and post-settlement conditional payments. Considering Medicare’s past and future interests will ensure that the burden for payment of future medical treatment isn’t being shifted to Medicare and that Medicare benefits for the individual will be protected.
If you have additional questions on how to address Medicare’s past or future interests in a case, please click here.

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06/Apr/2022

On Wednesday, April 13 at 1 pm EST, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will host a webinar regarding the new “Go Paperless” option in the Medicare Secondary Payer Recovery Portal.  The Go Paperless Quick Reference Guide can be downloaded here.  The full notice can be read below:

 


The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will be hosting an overview of the new “Go Paperless” feature available in the Medicare Secondary Payer Recovery Portal (MSPRP). Insurers and authorized agents may now choose to opt-in to paperless functionality. Once registered, users will be able to quickly and easily access all recovery correspondence including demand letters, using the MSPRP. Opting to “Go Paperless” in combination with the ability to submit correspondence through the MSPRP and the multiple available options for electronic payment will allow your organization to not only reduce the amount of paper that needs to be physically handled, associated workload and environmental impacts, but also eliminate concerns about delays that can arise when information is sent through the mail.
The webinar will feature opening remarks and a presentation, followed by a question and answer session.
Date: Wednesday, April 13, 2022
Time: 1:00 PM ET
Webinar URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PWXW2662768&p=6930242&t=c
and
Conference Dial In: 800-779-1251
Conference Passcode: 6930242
Please note that for this webinar you will need to access the webinar link and dial in using the information above to access the visual and audio portion of the presentation. Due to the number of participants please dial in at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the presentation.

 

Additional information about recent updates from CMS can be found here. If you have questions on how topics discussed in this webinar may affect your clients, please contact Medivest here or call us at 877.725.2467.

 


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24/Mar/2022

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a revised Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set-Aside Arrangement (WCMSA) Reference Guide (“Reference Guide”) Version 3.6 on March 15, 2022. This Reference Guide replaces Version 3.5 on January 10, 2022. There are a few notable changes when comparing the two Reference Guides.  The blue highlights below indicate the updated changes provided in Reference Guide Version 3.6.
To download the new WCMSA Reference Guide v3.6 click here.
Version 3.6 of this guide includes the following changes:
Clarification has been provided regarding the use of non-CMS-approved products to address future medical care (Section 4.3), as well as documentation and re-review tips (Sections 9.4.1.1, 10.2, and 16.1).

 

4.3 The Use of Non-CMS-Approved Products to Address Future Medical Care – Additions and Replacements

A number of industry products exist for the purpose of complying with the Medicare Secondary Payer regulations without participation in the voluntary WCMSA review process set forth in this reference guide. Although not inclusive of all products covered under this section, these products are most commonly termed “evidence-based” or “non-submit.”
42 C.F.R. 411.46 specifically allows CMS to deny payment for treatment of work-related conditions if a settlement does not adequately protect the Medicare program’s interest. Unless a proposed amount is submitted, reviewed, and approved using the process described in this reference guide prior to settlement, CMS cannot be certain that the Medicare program’s interests are adequately protected. As such, CMS treats the use of non-CMS-approved products as a potential attempt to shift financial burden by improperly giving reasonable recognition to both medical expenses and income replacement.
As a matter of policy and practice, CMS may at its sole discretion deny payment for medical services related to the WC injuries or illness, requiring attestation of appropriate exhaustion equal to the total settlement as defined in Section 10.5.3 of this reference guide, less procurement costs and paid conditional payments, before CMS will resume primary payment obligation for settled injuries or illnesses, unless it is shown, at the time of exhaustion of the MSA funds, that both the initial funding of the MSA was sufficient, and utilization of MSA funds was appropriate. This will result in the claimant needing to demonstrate complete exhaustion of the net settlement amount, rather than a CMS-approved WCMSA amount.
Notes: This official policy shall apply to all notifications of settlement that include the use of a non-CMS-approved product received on, or after, January 11, 2022; however, flags in the Common Working File for notifications received prior to that date will be set to ensure Medicare does not make payment during the spend-down period.
CMS does not intend for this policy to affect any settlement that would not otherwise meet review thresholds. This comment does not relieve the settling parties of an obligation to consider Medicare’s interests as part of the settlement; however, CMS does not expect notification or submission where thresholds are not met. 

 

9.4.1.1 Most Frequent Reasons for Development Requests – Expanded Explanations

The five most frequent reasons for development requests by the WCRC:
    1. Insufficient or out-of-date medical records. Medical records are required documents for all submissions, including situations where the parties are in dispute.
    2. Insufficient payment histories, usually because the records do not provide a breakdown for medical, indemnity or expenses categories. Payment histories are required documents for all submissions, including situations where the parties are in dispute, and must include breakdowns for payment categories along with identification of any category codes.
    3. Failure to address draft or final settlement agreements and court rulings in the cover letter or elsewhere in the submission. Draft or final settlement agreements and court rulings are required documents for all submissions, if they exist. For settlements where conditional payments are made as an element of the agreement, the WCRC will not accept a letter indicating that draft or final settlements do not exist.
    4. Documents that are referenced in the file are not provided—this usually occurs with court rulings or settlement documents.
    5. References to state statutes or regulations without providing sufficient documentation (i.e., to which payments the statutes/regulations apply or a copy of the statute or regulation, or notice of which statutes or regulations apply to which payments).

 

10.2 Section 10 – Consent to Release Note – Additions

The Consent to Release note is the claimant’s signed authorization for CMS, its agents and/or contractors to discuss his or her case/medical condition with the parties identified on the authorization in regard to the WC settlement that includes a WCMSA. When you submit your WCMSA, you are required to include the signed consent, plus any applicable court papers if the consent is signed by someone other than the claimant (for example, a guardian, power of attorney, etc.). Do not include unsigned consents or consents to obtain medical records from a provider.
All consent-to-release notes must include language indicating that the beneficiary reviewed the submission package and understands the WCMSA intent, submission process, and associated administration. This section of the consent form must include at least the beneficiary’s initials to indicate their validation.
Consent to Release documents must be signed (by hand or electronically) with the full name of either the claimant, matching the claimant’s legal name, or by the claimant’s authorized representative, if documentation establishing the relationship is also provided. It must be a full signature, not just initials. For electronic standards, only the use of an E-SIGN Act-compliant e-signature or initials are considered valid.
If there is a change in submitter, please see Section 19.4 for more information.

 

16.1 Re-Review – Additions

A request for re-review may be submitted based one of the following:
    1. Mathematical Error: Where the appropriately authorized submitter or claimant disagrees with CMS’ decision because CMS’ determination contains obvious mistakes (e.g., a mathematical error or failure to recognize medical records already submitted showing a surgery, priced by CMS, that has already occurred), or
    2. Missing Documentation: Where the submitter or claimant disagrees with CMS’ decision because the submitter has additional evidence, not previously considered by CMS, which was dated prior to the submission date of the original proposal and which warrants a change in CMS’ determination.
      • Disagreement surrounding the inclusion or exclusion of specific treatments or medications does not meet the definition of a mathematical error.
      • Re-Review requests based upon failure to properly review already submitted records must include only the specific documentation referenced as a basis for the request.
      • Should no change be made upon response to a re-review request (i.e. no error was identified), additional requests to re-review the same error will not be entertained.”

 

Analysis

The removal of the reference to indemnification in the first part of Section 4.3 seems to have been CMS’s way of expressing its realization that the intent of settling parties in using non-submit WCMSAs is to protect Medicare’s interests as opposed to being designed merely to protect against MSP exposure via a shift of risk from one company’s errors and omissions coverage to another’s.
[Old Section 4.3 phrase]: “with the intent of indemnifying insurance carriers and CMS beneficiaries against future recovery for conditional payments made by CMS for settled injuries.” [New Section 4.3 phrase]: “for the purpose of complying with the Medicare Secondary Payer regulations without participation in the voluntary WCMSA review process set forth in this reference guide.”
Does the additional language about expectations for WC settlements that do not meet workload review threshold in Section 4.3 now really clarify what the plan for future care should be when the two examples in Section 8.1, titled Review Thresholds still describe recoveries by CMS for payments and care related to the injury up to the total value of the settlement if the settling parties fail to consider Medicare’s future interests/fail to establish “some plan for future care” ?  The referenced examples are listed below for ease of access:
Example 1: A recent retiree aged 67 and eligible for Medicare benefits under Parts A, B, and D files a WC claim against their former employer for the back injury sustained shortly before retirement that requires future medical care. The claim is offered settlement for a total of $17,000.00. However, this retiree will require the use of an anti-inflammatory drug for the balance of their life. The settling parties must consider CMS’ future interests even though the case would not be eligible for review. Failure to do so could leave settling parties subject to future recoveries for payments related to the injury up to the total value of the settlement ($17,000.00).
Example 2: A 47 year old steelworker breaks their ankle in such a manner that leaves the individual permanently disabled. As a result, the worker should become eligible for Medicare benefits in the next 30 months based upon eligibility for Social Security Disability benefits. The  steelworker is offered a total settlement of $225,000.00, inclusive of future care. Again, there is a likely need for no less than pain management for this future beneficiary. The case would be ineligible for review under the non-CMS-beneficiary standard requiring a case total settlement to be greater than $250,000.00 for review. Not establishing some plan for future care places settling parties at risk for recovery from care related to the WC injury up to the full value of the settlement.

 

Stay Up To Date

Count on Medivest to help you navigate your risk tolerance in light of the new CMS WCMSA Reference Guide language to see if we can’t find the right balance to reasonably protect Medicare’s interests in your settlement. Medivest will continue to monitor changes in the guidance and regulations published by CMS and will keep its readers up to date when such changes are announced/made. For questions regarding these updates, please reach out to a Medivest representative in your area by clicking here or by calling us direct at 877.725.2467.

 


CMS-webinar-blog.png
08/Feb/2022

On Thursday, February 17 at 1 pm EST, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will host a webinar regarding Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set-Aside (WCMSA). The full notice can be read below:


 

CMS will be hosting a webinar to discuss a variety of WCMSA topics, including a summary of what’s new in Medicare set-asides, and addressing questions related to the inclusion of treatments, application of state rules, re-reviews/amended reviews and more. The webinar format will be opening remarks and a presentation by CMS followed by a live question and answer session with representatives from CMS.

Date: Thursday, February 17, 2022
Time: 1:00 PM ET

Webinar URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PWXW2628369&p=6930242&t=c

and

Conference Dial-In: 800-779-1251
Conference Passcode: 6930242

Please note that for this webinar you will need to access the webinar link and dial in using the information above to access the visual and audio portion of the presentation. Due to the number of participants please dial in at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the presentation.


 

Additional information about recent updates from CMS about WCMSAs can be found here. If you have questions on how topics discussed in this webinar may affect your clients, please contact Medivest here or call us at 877.725.2467.

 


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